Sentinel-1B recovery activities by ESA are now over

The European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC) together launched the Sentinel-1 mission as the European Radar Observatory for the Copernicus project. A European program called Copernicus aims to implement information services related to security and the environment. It is based on data collected from ground-based sources and observational information from Earth observation satellites.

As part of the Sentinel-1 mission, C-band imaging is used in four distinct imaging modes with varying resolution (down to 5 m) and range (up to 400 km). Rapid product delivery, dual-polarization capability, and very low revisit times are all provided. The spacecraft’s position and attitude can be precisely measured for each observation.

Data transmission was lost as a result of an anomaly that the spacecraft encountered starting on December 23, 2021. The ESA said online on January 10, 2022, that the primary cause of the problem was a power problem and that the first attempts to rectify it had been unsuccessful. Before stating on August 3, 2022, that attempts to recover the program would cease, the agency stated that attempts to regain spacecraft capacities would continue.

The European Space Agency will expedite the deployment of a replacement in place of continuing to try to fix the Sentinel-1B radar imaging satellite which stopped working more than six months ago.

In a statement released on August 3, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced that it and the European Commission, Sentinel-1B’s co-developers and partners on the Copernicus family of Earth observation satellites, were ending the mission of the spacecraft over6 years after it was launched. In December 2021, that payload developed a problem, and since then, ESA has been attempting to recover it.

According to a summary of the inquiry into the SAR payload failure, the SAR payload’s two power regulators had problems. The payload can only be operated by one. With one exception in April, when the major regulator switched on for a period of 4.4 seconds before going off once more, attempts to restore them were unsuccessful. This gave “useful observations to pinpoint potential failure modes,” according to the summary.

The research came to the conclusion that the power regulators failure was most likely caused by “a probable leakage of a ceramic capacitor” that was discovered in both regulators and had to be substituted during the payload’s fabrication and testing. It might have been harmed by the soldering on the replacement.

“The Anomaly Review Board concluded that it is impossible to regain the 28V regulated bus of the satellite’s C-band SAR (synthetic aperture radar) antenna power supply unit, that is required to power the radar electronics,” Simonetta Cheli, head of ESA’s Earth observation program, stated in a statement unveiling the mission’s end.

The European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC) together launched the Sentinel-1 mission as the European Radar Observatory for the Copernicus project. A European program called Copernicus aims to implement information services related to security and the environment. It is based on data collected from ground-based sources and observational information from Earth observation satellites.

As part of the Sentinel-1 mission, C-band imaging is used in four distinct imaging modes with varying resolution (down to 5 m) and range (up to 400 km). Rapid product delivery, dual-polarization capability, and very low revisit times are all provided. The spacecraft’s position and attitude can be precisely measured for each observation.

Data transmission was lost as a result of an anomaly that the spacecraft encountered starting on December 23, 2021. The ESA said online on January 10, 2022, that the primary cause of the problem was a power problem and that the first attempts to rectify it had been unsuccessful. Before stating on August 3, 2022, that attempts to recover the program would cease, the agency stated that attempts to regain spacecraft capacities would continue.

The European Space Agency will expedite the deployment of a replacement in place of continuing to try to fix the Sentinel-1B radar imaging satellite which stopped working more than six months ago.

In a statement released on August 3, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced that it and the European Commission, Sentinel-1B’s co-developers and partners on the Copernicus family of Earth observation satellites, were ending the mission of the spacecraft over6 years after it was launched. In December 2021, that payload developed a problem, and since then, ESA has been attempting to recover it.

According to a summary of the inquiry into the SAR payload failure, the SAR payload’s two power regulators had problems. The payload can only be operated by one. With one exception in April, when the major regulator switched on for a period of 4.4 seconds before going off once more, attempts to restore them were unsuccessful. This gave “useful observations to pinpoint potential failure modes,” according to the summary.

The research came to the conclusion that the power regulators failure was most likely caused by “a probable leakage of a ceramic capacitor” that was discovered in both regulators and had to be substituted during the payload’s fabrication and testing. It might have been harmed by the soldering on the replacement.

“The Anomaly Review Board concluded that it is impossible to regain the 28V regulated bus of the satellite’s C-band SAR (synthetic aperture radar) antenna power supply unit, that is required to power the radar electronics,” Simonetta Cheli, head of ESA’s Earth observation program, stated in a statement unveiling the mission’s end.

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